How to read Pamela J. Dodd’s books

ToT_cover_final_webLGI suppose there is a bit of a “duh” response to that title. Just buy them. Right? However, both Trinity on Tylos (the Whiskey Creek Press print book) and The Gift Horse (the Booklocker print book) are out of print, although some copies are still available from internet booksellers. Oh, and I have a few tucked into a box in the closet, and I would gladly sell them, but realistically, print is out of fashion these days. I seldom buy print books myself.

Instead of print, there are ways that modern readers can access my novels. Trinity on Tylos (the second, Kindle Direct version) is available for purchase or “free” for those who have a Kindle Unlimited reading subscription. The Gift Horse is available from the Kindle store as well as being available in ebook format from the original publisher.

And I am happy for readers to either buy or read via their Kindle subscription, because I get a bit of cash either way. Yes, my royalties for these are often in pennies, but I have zero expenses, which was certainly not the case when I had to buy books, drive to a venue, sit at a table and then hope someone would want to fork over $15 bucks for an autographed copy. Those were often money losing days!

My other author persona, Pilar Savage, makes more money, and she has never sat around hoping to sell her books, as they are only available as Kindle books via Amazon. The way to success as an author has certainly not changed—write something good enough that someone else will want to read it. But the method of delivery has changed quite a lot since I began publishing fiction.

Butterfly Garden— a review

Trust me, this book will get under your skin and into your memory. I’ve read a lot of books, but this one is haunting.

One of my favorite genres of fiction is what is sometimes termed psychological fiction because the author gets into the minds of the characters. Perhaps it is due to my life experiences, or maybe it is due to my eclectic reading, but I am fascinated by the caretaker/villian. One my first exposures to this genre was the film “The Collector” based on the novel by John Fowles. Later, I read the book, which was also fascinating, but perhaps even more disturbing than the movie, which nicely bridges the gap between suspense and horror.

I think that Dot Hutchinson may have read the same book. That is not to say that her novel, The Butterfly Garden, is a rip-off of The Collector; it is not. However, there are some common aspects, so I will say that my guess is that she was inspired by the Fowles novel. Both novels deal with a warped collector, interested in butterflies, and his hapless series of victims. But, the villain in The Collector had one victim (at a time); in Hutchinson’s novel, the Gardener has a much bigger operation. Hutchinson basically took the plot, then raised the stakes. Her villain is far more villainous, so be forewarned that this novel is really disturbing. There is some bad language, as well as non-graphic rape and other unpleasantness directed toward the female victims.

The Butterfly Garden is modern in tone, pace, and language. But it is more of a “why” novel than a “what novel” as it begins at the end, and the plot unfolds as detectives try to unravel the story of the interactions between our victim (who has 3 names before it is over, so I won’t name her here) and an individual that the main character knows as the Gardener. Our protagonist is more victim than heroine, but she is certainly brave in a multi-layered manner. The novel is well-written and sufficiently suspenseful for me to have read it in a couple of evenings.

There are few parallels between The Butterfly Garden and my own psychological novel, The Gift Horse. However, an exploration of the role of the victim is common to both. If any of you readers enjoyed The Gift Horse, and were not overly offended, then you should try The Butterfly Garden. I really, really enjoyed it. But, I am not am not outraged by villains doing really bad things. That is what makes such characters villains.