How much for a flu shot?

Mostly, I write about books, or maybe films. No doubt, I will do that again soon, but recently I have been experiencing various forms of health care, and my latest such visit was for the annual flu shot, so I’ll write a bit about that. For some years, I opted out of having this injection, but after hubby lost a week of work and felt terrible for even longer, I went back to getting the shot. After all, the couple of times I had influenza it was no fun at all.

Current United States policy (via the Affordable Care Act) requires that insurance cover the flu shot as a preventative measure, without any co-pay from the patient. So, my doctor’s office has made a business decision to “stick it” to the insurance company—pun intended. See the attached screen shot of the EOB for this procedure:

Flu Shot

Now, thinking that $248 is a bit steep for this, I just looked at GoodRx (a nifty site if you have never used it) and it tells me that the estimated cost for the shot is $32 at Walmart.

GoodRx

Now, going to my doctor’s office was convenient and fast, but I’ve had flu shots at the grocery store or at a mini clinic, and neither of those were inconvenient. Bottom line, the doctor’s office knows that they can charge whatever for preventive procedures, and my insurance has to pay for it, so they are taking advantage of this. Kudos to Walmart for making this injection available for regular folks. If you don’t have insurance, or if you want to keep it real, just go to the GoodRx site and put in your zip code. The site automatically offers several locations and price points. BTW, the average when I looked was $32.

As for Piedmont Athens Primary Care, they’ve made me think, yet again, that when insurance premiums go up again, and they will, their approach to business is one reason for those hefty increases.

 

Impossible Burger at Burger King

impossibleThe other day, hubby and I were eating at a favorite restaurant near our home. While perusing the menu, I noted that they now serve the “Impossible Burger” for $15. To be fair, that includes “free” salad and a side, but it struck me as a high price for a fake burger. I’m actually a fan of a good black bean burger, but these new fangled burgers (such as the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat) purport themselves to be equal in taste and texture to beef. But I wasn’t too keen on spending $15 when I could get a nice salmon fillet with two sides for $12, so we didn’t try it that day.

However, after church today, we went to a fast food restaurant. That’s quite unusual for us, but hey, I got to try an Impossible Burger for a possible price. The B&K palace we visited was one of a series of fast food joints along a busy highway, so they had customers, but not too many. We ordered the meal (a golly whopping 900+ calories) which includes a small drink and fries. BTW, neither the drink nor the fries didn’t seem all that small to me, but the gal at the counter seemed surprised that we didn’t take the 30 cent upgrade to medium.

Hubby looked a bit skeptical, but I dug in immediately. Low and behold  the Impossible “Whopper” tastes quite a lot like any old fast food burger—nothing outstanding, but just fine for the price paid. Anyway, the burger seemed a bit thinner than I remember for a whopper, but the condiments and bun made it a substantial sandwich, which we ate without cheese, as there seemed to be sufficient calories without that addition. The fries were good and crisp, and I ate half of them before shoving them across the table for hubby to finish.

My Fitness Pal tells me that I’ve just about eaten all I should for this day, but I can now say I’ve tried one of the latest innovations in food, and it is okay…as long as one has enough calories left to enjoy the thing. Oh, and I do recommend trying it at Burger King, because we both ate for the price of one at our local sit down and get waited on favorite.

iBooks and eBay—a winning combo

liver-rescue-apples

Apples and Apple, Inc.

As a reader of eBooks, I’ve been exploring new ways (and revisiting old ones) to view content. Recently, I saw a title touted on Facebook, and a quick look at eBay revealed several purchase options, including an eBook which was offered as a pdf file. I paid a golly whopping .99, and it arrived via email. Not quite as quick as Big A, but the seller offered pretty quick service. I tried reading the file via my email app, but that didn’t save my place, so I downloaded the file to iBooks. Winner, winner, but no chicken dinner. However, the iBooks app is a very good way to read a pdf file, and the app is easy to use, just like other, more well known ways to view eBook content. Certainly, the price was right, too.

When Big A (the relentless internet seller) decided to give me the old “heave, ho” I was a bit concerned about when and where I’d get new books to read, as I am not buying from them at the moment, but that fear has been allayed by the eBay and iBooks combination. The title I purchased is “Liver Rescue” which I won’t review, as I sincerely hope my readers don’t need it, but I’ll let you know that one way to help the liver is to eat lots of apples. Actually, I am very pleased to get a 500+ text for a buck, and the advice to eat a fruit I really like is welcome, also. Thanks eBay! And thanks to Apple, for making such an intuitive app for the iPad. Reading about apples on an Apple product is quite appropriate, isn’t it?