Alarm of War— The Other Side of Fear

A while back, I wrote a positive review of Kennedy Hudner’s Alarm of War. Perhaps its greatest downside was that it clearly was intended to have a sequel. For a few months, I checked Amazon, hoping that Hudner had released the second part, but after a while, I quit looking. Then, as I reviewed my “keeper” files, I saw Alarm of War and looked again. Low and behold, Alarm of War, Book II: The Other Side of Fear was published in 2014. Finally, I had the sequel, but alas, it’s really part II of a trilogy. So, I am back to waiting.

However, it would be remiss to not review the second book. So, here’s a true confession: I went back and re-read the Alarm of War because it had been so long that I was certain I needed a refresher. Good plan, as I enjoyed it almost as much the second time. Once I had swiped the last page, I jumped right into The Other Side of Fear, and it wowed me from the opening scene.

While there are some stereotypical situations and characters, there is plenty of depth to Hudner’s ensemble of main characters, who met as they went through basic training during the first novel. My favorite is Emily Tuttle, a former history teacher with a brilliant grasp of military strategy. Other main characters include Grant Skiffington, the favored son of an admiral; Hiram Brill, a geeky guy who instinctively puts together intelligence into workable prophecies; and Marine sergeant Maria Sanchez, who is super gung ho, but reads books and likes to hang out with the nerd, Hiram. These characters all had intertwining adventures in the first book and book two immediately picks up the action.

Rather than write a bunch of spoilers, I will say this: Mr. Hudner’s series reminds me quite a lot of the early works of David Weber, the creator of the great Honor Harrington series. But, by using the ensemble, rather than centering on one character, Hudner is able to bring in various aspects of his universe, but keep the reader’s interest. At times, Weber spends more time explaining his villains than his heroine, and that has always bothered me. As a huge fan of military sci fi in general, and Honor Harrington in particular, it is hard to say this, but, “Move over, Mr. Weber.” Kennedy Hudner is writing some seriously kick-butt military sci-fi. Really.

As of this writing, the first book is a bargain at 99¢, and The Other Side of Fear is $3.99. My gosh, so much entertainment for less than the price of a movie ticket!

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Wild Irish Heart— quick review and comments

Irish romanceWhile I don’t often read romance, February is the month to do so, now isn’t it? This novel is a bit of mystery, but with plenty of romance. It is not, however, one where a major sexual encounter happens before a third of the book is over. FYI!

Tricia O’Malley’s Wild Irish Heart (The Mystic Cove Series Book 1) begins the “Mystic Cove Series,” and it is a pleasant read, if not a compelling one. Our heroine, Keelin O’Brien, has been reared in Boston, by her successful real estate agent mother, who left Ireland and Keelin’s dad behind long ago. For reasons that are a bit of a mystery to Keelin, her mother doesn’t talk about the past, especially about Ireland. Soon, the reader learns that Keelin herself is a bit of a mystery, too, because she has a power that most of us don’t have.

When an ancient book arrives with a note which simply says, “It is time,” Keelin decides to go to Ireland, on an extended visit with the family that her mother shunned long ago. Thus begins her dual quest: to learn her past, and to see how her gift fits into her future. There are not many surprises on this journey, but Keelin does struggle to figure out how her attraction to a certain fellow that she meets early on will fit into her new life. Or is she somehow mistaken, and this isn’t the guy for her?

This novel has some supernatural elements, but it is mostly a bit of a mystery wrapped up in romantic garb. And it is a nice read for the month which features Valentine’s Day.

BTW, I read the Kindle version, as it was featured as a freebie a while back, and as of this post, the current price is 0.00. According to Amazon, it is also available in paperback and as an Audible book, if you like that format.

Wes Moss’s “Starting from Scratch”

Wes Moss ScratchI’ve listened to Wes Moss for years now. He’s the host of “Money Matters” on a local radio station, and he seems to be an approachable, common-sense guy. That tone serves him well when he writes, too. Previously, I reviewed his book on “You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think (Business Books),” and it is an excellent book on preparing for retirement. This is an earlier book, but the approach is similar in certain ways.

In this book on entrepreneurship, Moss discusses the best ways to begin a business, and he uses the acronym HUNT to explain the qualities and techniques used by successful business start ups. The H stands for “harness what you have” and the U stands for “underestimate obstacles.” Each of the sections of the book are grouped around a letter, so some of the stories illustrate the H, then some illustrate the U (but also rely on the H, of course.) Later stories deal with N “Notice your network” and finally T for “Take the first step.” Again, each of these is illustrated by several stories (21 or 22 in all, depending on when edition you read.)

The analysis of how to begin and nurture a business is just as common-sense as other Wes Moss’s writings, and the stories of each entrepreneur are short enough to allow quick reading, but in depth enough to realize that these people did what many want to do but can’t quite see the way forward. And, as the stats for success vs. failure in small business are a bit daunting, the stories are inspirational.

If you have ever wondered if you could begin a business, then this book should be a very welcome read. I quite enjoyed it, although I have many irons in the employment fire and no desire to begin yet another venture.

Bill O’Reilly’s Legends and Lies: The Real West

My dad was fond of westerns, mostly on television, as we didn’t have the cash to visit the cinema often, and he wasn’t a reader. His favorites were Gunsmoke the mini-series Lonesome Dove. However, we watched a lot of them in the day. So the names Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Daniel Boone, Billy the Kid, General Custer, Davy Crockett, and Doc Holliday seem rather familiar. As I read Bill O’Reilly’s book, Legends and Lies: The Real West, I got the impression that he was attempting to inform those of us who learned our history of the west by watching the Hollywood versions that much of what we remember might fall within the two categories: legends and lies. Indeed, the afterward explains how westerns came to be such a staple in early films and series television, and I enjoyed that more than any other part of this book.

Overall, I enjoyed O’Reilly’s informative text, but after reading Killing Patton (see my previous post) this one was a bit of a let down. The stories were not nearly as compelling as the story of Patton. However, it is interesting, and the period photos are really nifty. For those who are students of historical figures in the old West, this might be too basic, but for casual readers, the tone and depth is just right.

I read the Kindle version, so the pictures were a bit hard to see. For anyone really interested in the photography, the hard cover might be better.

Killing Patton— a quick review and commentary

Killing Patton cover imageGeorge C. Scott’s portrait of World War II General George Patton was my introduction to the famous hero. And, that is a very good film, but the book Killing Patton has an even more narrow focus. Authors Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard begin at the end, Patton’s untimely death, then jump back a year or so, to meticulously trace Patton’s role (and that of the 3rd Army) in the successful final campaigns against Germany at the end of World War II. General Patton was quite a character, with his ivory handled pistols and flashy uniform, but he also was far more aggressive than other American generals, and actually lost fewer men because he didn’t mess around! Anyway, he did not always suck up to those in authority, spoke his mind on the dangers of the Soviets, thus he made both friends and enemies. The authors label him as the most “audacious” U. S. general, and that’s a good word. I’ve always admired Patton’s forthright approach to war and life. Rather than give away the suggested culprit in Killing Patton, let me say that O’ Reilly and Dugard offer multiple possible persons who might want Patton dead. These authors do seem to believe that one of them was behind several attempts on Patton’s life. Certainly, they make a good case that Patton’s death was not an accident. Killing Patton is a very good book, with plenty of history and just enough mystery to keep it entertaining, and I highly recommend it.

My interest in the book goes beyond my admiration for General George S. Patton. As this Veteran’s Day approaches, my mind has often turned to my uncle, A.L. Dodd, Junior, who was also in Europe. PFC Dodd served as an automatic rifleman in the 9th Army, 75th Division, which was somewhat north of Patton’s 3rd Army in their journey through Europe. My uncle, just nineteen years old, was killed in action in April of 1945, a few days before the German surrender. Of course, my uncle died long before my birth, but family members told me that he was in the Ruhr Valley, and he was shot by a German machine gunner. So, seventy years ago, he died, along with hundreds of thousands of others. This book, with its detailed accounts of the major players in the war, helped me understand what was happening in Europe (and in America) in 1945.

At the time, the United States was very much a singular nation, which rallied to do what was right. Neither Patton nor any of the other U.S. soldiers were perfect men, but many of them performed nearly miraculous feats of bravery— they were heroes.

Infinity Lost— a quick review

I’m in the midst of a semester of teaching writing, and I generally read and write less when faced with lots of student papers. However, I did spend a couple of evenings with Infinity Lost by S Harrison. The main character is Finn, the only child of a reclusive industrial tycoon. Finn is an innocent, but as the story unfolds, she is not just a teenage girl. Certainly, science fiction is a favorite genre, and this entry by a new-to-me author is quite interesting.

There are some neat concepts in this story. At times, it was a bit confusing, but mostly, the author does a very good job of describing interesting technology. there is quite a bit of suspense, too. Actually, I began thinking that this novel reads well, but it might be a better screen play than a novel. It is the first entry in a trilogy, and I suppose there might be a film in the making.

Forged by Jennifer Rush (a quick review of an even quicker read!)


Yeah, we just got underway with a new semester, so I haven’t had much time to read… and even less to write. However, I did squeeze in an evening of reading, which I devoted to “Forged” by Jennifer Rush. This is closer to a long short story than to a novella, but it is billed as a prequel, so that’s fair, I suppose. Since I haven’t read any of the series, I was a bit baffled by this piece. Dani seems to be quite the victim, but she is being manipulated somehow. The writing is good, but there seemed to be more going on than I was able to understand. The why and the who were a bit ambiguous, and the twist at the end was indeed unexpected.

Ultimately, I felt more confused than intrigued, but those were my mixed emotions when I got to the end. Others seem to enjoy the series, so at some point, I may revisit it, but “Forged” was simply not compelling. So… let’s say it is for fans, but not a good intro to the series.

Up to Date— a quick review of a quick read.


Very light romance is not normally my thing, but a friend suggested that if I would “like” Gemma Halliday on Facebook that I could get a freebie on Friday. So, one of the recent choices was a romance novella called Up to Date, which is also billed as Better Date than Never series, Book #8.

When I began Up to Date by Susan Hatler, I was immediately hooked. The main character’s name is Ginger. Her sister is named Mary Ann. And, yes, their dad was a big fan of Gilligan’s Island. The tone of this book kinda goes along with that… a bit romantic and quite a bit of comedy. This version of Ginger is miserable in her job, because being an office manager is a real snoozefest. Her home life lacks stability, because flighty sister Mary Ann never seems to have money to pay rent, but has lots to spend on frivolous social matters. Ginger is artistic and highly interested in home decor, so her true calling is to be an interior decorator. Knowing this, and knowing her talent for it, a friend suggests that Ginger donate her design services as a prize in a charity auction. The winner of the auction is a guy who wanted to date Ginger, but in typical romance fiction style, Ginger doesn’t care for him. Or maybe she does.

Anyway, I really enjoyed this light romance and urge those who enjoy the genre to download Up to Date. I read the Kindle version, and it is a most pleasant way to spend an evening.

Tales of Honor: Bred To Kill #1 (Comics Review)

I’m looking forward to the further adventures on Honor Harrington in this new medium.

Shadowhawk's Shade

Tales of Honor is the adaptation of David Weber’s Honor Harrington novel series and is written by Matt Hawkins, who is one of my favourite writers in the biz, and is drawn by Linda Sejic, an artist I don’t have much of an experience with, but love her work nonetheless. I’ve read a couple issues of the previous Tales of Honor volume, and even the recent FCBD issue, not to mention that I read the first novel recently as well, so I’m pretty well-versed with the setting and the characters, and going into this new arc, that’s a good thing since I can orient myself that much quicker.

Tales of Honor: Bred To Kill #1 picks up sometime after the recent war with the People’s Republic of Haven in the Basilisk system, and it has Honor coming back during some downtime from her job as the Captain of the HMS…

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Mockingbird— a novel for children, but a good read for adults as well

Mockingbird by Kathryn ErskineMy local library doesn’t have an available copy of Harper Lee’s new/old Go Set a Watchman available just yet, so I chose a novel that I first learned about when taking a graduate level course in improving reading in secondary schools, Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine. The premise in this YA novel is that our narrator, Caitlyn, is a fifth-grader with Asperger’s Syndrome. I have a family member with a similar diagnosis, so this novel interests me on more than one level. Caitlyn had been quite dependent on an older brother, Devon, but he is not with her any longer. For anyone who does not know, the vast majority of symptoms of Asperger’s are associated with communications skills. Caitlyn exhibits many of the classic symptoms, but there is both humor and pathos in her approach to life. Her father seems to want to help her and connect with her, but he is suffering from a different malady. As the exposition unfolds, the reader learns that Devon was killed in a school shooting and their mother died of cancer a couple of years prior to the events of the novel. So the father is reeling emotionally, and Caitlyn is struggling with adjusting to these losses and with trying to develop empathy for other people. Other players in this novel include young Caitlyn’s teacher, counselor, and her fellow students. Try as she might, Caitlyn has trouble “getting” what others seem to understand with little trouble. This, too, is typical for Aspies.

Mockingbird derives its title from the many references to the movie/book To Kill a Mockingbird, and I do not believe that the novel would resonate nearly as well if the reader had not either seen TKAM or read it. But, with most readers knowing a bit about the famous story by Harper Lee, it is fairly safe to say that most readers will “get” the references.  Indeed, I really, really enjoyed the novel, but I did need some tissue toward the end— it is that kind of story.

Reading YA lit is more and more common these days, because big publishing is far more open to publishing those stories. Getting a contract is rather difficult for new writers of adult fiction, but YA sells well, so it is becoming a crowded field. I don’t want to spoil it for potential readers, but I do want to encourage fans of TKAM to read Mockingbird. Although it could be read by upper elementary on up, it is a touching story for readers of any age.