Count the flags!

FlagWe had an interesting discussion about celebrating America’s Independence Day, and the  ways to celebrate are as diverse as the country itself. Most of the towns around here offer some sort of fireworks, usually preceded by live music, and people bring lawn chairs and visit for a while. When our kids were kids, we usually visited the one in the town where we lived. Currently, we live out in the country, so we don’t usually bother.

Hubby wants to watch a movie, preferably Independence Day Resurgence(Bluray+DVD+Digital HD). We loved the original ID4 movie, but somehow we missed seeing the sequel. Despite its mediocre reviews, I imagine that we’ll be looking for that one in a couple of days.

In my work as an adjunct instructor, I work with students from lots of differing situations, but some of the most interesting are immigrants to our country. Many of them are just so appreciative for the opportunities that Americans have. I remember one gentleman, originally from Romania, who came over a couple of decades back, beginning with nothing but some work ethic. At first he made his living doing odd jobs. He worked his way into owning his own construction business, and he and his wife raised their family through hard work and savvy real estate deals. At our college, he was working on his HVAC (that’s heating and air-conditioning) certification, as he wanted to open an HVAC business so he could scale back doing difficult construction work as he aged. Being a very smart business man, he said that in the south making money on repairing air conditioning was a sure thing! One day at the end of our class, he spend probably half an hour, telling all of us about what a wonderful country we were living in, because he could never do all that he was doing in the economically and socially constricted country of his birth. It was quite refreshing. Sometimes, caught up in the polarized morass of modern media, Americans forget just how wonderful our country is, and how it differs from others.

When I mentioned that it can be difficult teaching young children about our country, one  mother of youngsters mentioned that when they are driving in the car, her kids count flags. Regardless of the destination, they look for the red, white, and blue symbol of our great country. That, too, is a great way to begin celebrating the good ol’ US of A.

Happy American Independence Day, y’all.

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Bill O’Reilly’s Legends and Lies: The Real West

My dad was fond of westerns, mostly on television, as we didn’t have the cash to visit the cinema often, and he wasn’t a reader. His favorites were Gunsmoke the mini-series Lonesome Dove. However, we watched a lot of them in the day. So the names Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Daniel Boone, Billy the Kid, General Custer, Davy Crockett, and Doc Holliday seem rather familiar. As I read Bill O’Reilly’s book, Legends and Lies: The Real West, I got the impression that he was attempting to inform those of us who learned our history of the west by watching the Hollywood versions that much of what we remember might fall within the two categories: legends and lies. Indeed, the afterward explains how westerns came to be such a staple in early films and series television, and I enjoyed that more than any other part of this book.

Overall, I enjoyed O’Reilly’s informative text, but after reading Killing Patton (see my previous post) this one was a bit of a let down. The stories were not nearly as compelling as the story of Patton. However, it is interesting, and the period photos are really nifty. For those who are students of historical figures in the old West, this might be too basic, but for casual readers, the tone and depth is just right.

I read the Kindle version, so the pictures were a bit hard to see. For anyone really interested in the photography, the hard cover might be better.